All About Ferret Permits

Domestic pet ferrets, Mustela furo(sometimes called Mustela putorius furo), are not wild animals. They have been domesticated for a very long time, perhaps two or three thousand years. They’re not equipped to survive for very long on their own; escaped pets suffer from dehydration, starvation and exposure, and usually don’t survive more than a few days unless someone takes them in.

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Training Your Ferret

Like kittens and puppies, ferret kits must be taught not to nip. A ferret which has been bred to be a pet shouldn’t be vicious or bite, but ferret play does include mock combat, and young ones won’t know how hard they can put their teeth on you without hurting you.

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Guide to Treats for Ferrets

Most ferrets enjoy some fruits and vegetables. Although they’re not necessary for good nutrition if you’re feeding your pets a high-quality cat food, small amounts of these won’t hurt. Just be sure you don’t fill your ferret up on fruit, since he’ll need to eat his regular food to get the required protein.

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Ferret-Proofing Your Home

As every ferret owner knows, our little friends love to get into trouble. Whether your ferrets live in a cage when you’re not around or are free all the time, whether they live in a single room or have the run of the house, the first line of defense, both for your ferrets and for your possessions, is a well-ferret-proofed home.

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Housing Your Ferret

Many people keep their ferrets in a cage or very well-ferret-proofed room whenever they can’t be supervised. This drastically reduces the risks of digestive-tract blockages from swallowing indigestible objects, injury, and escape. However, even if you plan to let your ferrets have the run of the house at all times, you’ll want a cage at first for litter-training and other kinds of training as well as for temporary use.

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