Introduction to Canine Allergies

Up to 20% of US dogs are thought to suffer from canine allergies. In the worst cases, an allergy can severely affect your dog’s enjoyment of life. Naturally, it’s important to identify and eliminate the source of the problem, and to control the symptoms. But the good news is that there are plenty of treatments available, many of them remarkably effective.

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Stretching Techniques for Dogs

Like us, dogs benefit from stretching: Our muscle cells work the same. This fact inspired the Foster sisters – Sasha, a certified canine rehabilitation therapist, and Ashley, a certified pet dog trainer – to apply 20 years of research on human stretching to the canine world. The result is their book, The Healthy Way to Stretch Your Dog.

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Signs of Illness in Your Dog

When your dog is ill, the sooner you intervene, the better. While lethargy and changes in appetite and elimination patterns are easily detectable, other signs of illness may slip under the radar for months on end. Dr. Trisha Joyce, a veterinarian at NYC Veterinary Specialists, offers advice on what you should watch out for to ensure your pet stays healthy.

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Dog Summer Bummer Diseases

Dr. Sheldon Rubin delivered sobering news to the owner of a schnauzer during a recent visit to his Chicago practice. The dog tested positive for heartworm and faced a long, expensive treatment involving painful shots, says Dr. Rubin, DVM, who is president of the American Heartworm Society.

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Automatic Dog Eyedrops in the Works

When Gora, a bomb-sniffing German shepherd working for the Department of the Navy, began to have chronically red eyes and discharge, her Washington, D.C., caretakers took the professional pooch to her veterinarian. Gora was diagnosed with a common autoimmune condition called pannus. The veterinarian prescribed eyedrops, but Gora’s eye problem didn’t end there.

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Tapeworm Prevention, Diagnosis and Treatment

Treatment of tapeworms is doubly important because these worms can be transmitted to people. The same larvae infecting your pet can migrate into a person and cause either a skin infection or in some cases an internal infection to the liver. This disease is called visceral larval migrans. This is why deworming all puppies is recommended, even if the fecal analysis is negative, and request regular stool examinations.

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De-Fleaing Your Home

Fleas feed and lay eggs on your pet for part of the day. They will also jump off and propagate in grass, soil, carpeting, cracks of hardwood floors, and furniture in and around your house. Even if your pet is indoors, anyone or anything can introduce fleas into your home.

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Ticks, Lyme Disease, and Dogs & Cats

Lyme Disease is caused by a spirochete called Borrelia. A spirochete is a type of bacterium. It is transmitted to dogs through the bite of a tick. Once in the blood stream, it is carried to many parts of the body. It is especially likely to localize in joints. It was first thought that only a few types of ticks could transmit this disease, but now it appears that several common species may be involved.

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