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Cats and Dementia | Expert Pet Advice | PetPeoplesPlace.com

Cats and Dementia

James Glover
by James Glover
View Biography

QuestionCan a cat get dementia and if so what are the symptoms? (Stephanie Hampson - Australia)

Answer

In terms of a progressive decline in cognitive function, then yes cats can suffer from dementia. As with dogs and humans, cats live longer in a domestic setting than in the wild environment and as such sometimes they lost their cognitive functions before suffering from any old-age-related physical problems. Scientists have found abnormal proteins similar to those in humans suffering from Alzheimer's in the brains of diseased cats during routine autopsies by using special tests. And many owners of older cats will be familiar with the signs of dementia.

Senility is a gradual process and may be barely noticeable until the cat begins house-soiling or an indoor/outdoor cat gets lost frequently or wanders erratically. Just like the kidneys, liver and heart, your cat's brain degenerates and his memory and behavior change. Genetics plays a part in determining when and how fast these changes occur - sometimes as young as 12 years old, sometimes not at all, even in a cat of 20+ years old.

A senile cat is often forgetful of his own well-being. He may venture into risky areas, be unable to find his way back home, and become incontinent. He may show repetitive behaviors such as walking in circles, plucking fur or aimless movements. It is also important to point out, however, that some indications of dementia can also be a symptom of a physical illness - for example incontinence could be caused by bladder disease. Therefore, I always recommend that your cat has a thorough veterinary examination whenever you notice a change in behavior.

Disclaimer: This service is meant to provide advice only and is not meant to replace an appointment with a registered veterinarian. Users should always seek a second opinion. Unfortunately we are only able to answer several questions per week so not everyone gets a published answer. And, unfortunately we can't answer by email.
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