PETA

This topic contains 44 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  Donna 7 years, 5 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 45 total)
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  • #490495

    Calla
    Member

    I support PETA. I think that any kind of animal cruelty should be punished.

    #490496

    Melyssa
    Member

    I definitely support PETA! I have always loved animals! I treat my dog better than some people treat their kids. Haha! I am also vegetarian by choice. I have never even tried red meat. My entire family are carnivores but I’ve just never wanted meat. Animals are people too in my opinion. They have hearts, brains and feelings.

    #490497

    Jacey
    Member

    I support People who are against cruelty to animals, but I dont dont support people who buy 2000 deer tags and burn them because they cant bear to see someone hunt a deer. Some people are too poor to afford to go buy beef all year long. NOT EVERYBODY WANTS TO BE A VEGETARIAN!!!! Meat is a good thing and it is practically necessary to the human diet.

    #490498

    Jasmine
    Member

    I am totally against animal cruelty and lab testing. Even cruelty against food animals is wrong to me. However I do eat meat and see nothing wrong with wearing leather. Leather is made from cow hide, we eat cows and use the whole thing as apposed to wasting. But I do believe that food animals should be treated well and not be put in cages or small pens and treated badly. I only eat free ranch organic meat.

    #490499

    Jan
    Member

    QUOTE: "I definitely support PETA! I have always loved animals! I treat my dog better than some people treat their kids. Haha! I am also vegetarian by choice. I have never even tried red meat. My entire family are carnivores but I’ve just never wanted meat. Animals are people too in my opinion. They have hearts, brains and feelings."
    PETA and loving animals are not the same thing. The HSUS has nothing to do with local Humane Societies. PETA wants all animals wiped off the face of the earth, pretty much. HSUS has millions of dollars and you can go anywhere on the internet and look up their budget, and see how about 1% of that money actually goes to help animals.
    PETA wants all animals to roam free. Have you ever seen a cow that could survive in the wild? No, because they’re not meant to.
    I really wish that people would do some READING outside of Peta propaganda before they jump into the cult mentality headfirst, eyes closed.

    #490500

    Jan
    Member

    I don’t know you…but I like you. People need to be told the truth.

    #490501

    Jan
    Member

    That last post was for dreamhunter….

    #490502

    Donna
    Member

    I absolutely do not support People Exploiting Tortured Animals.
    They are a corrupt and radical animal rights organization with a long-term goal of ending all animal ‘use’–this means an end to hunting, animal agriculture of any kind, and pet ownership–period. They would happily see dogs and cats go extinct, to end pet ownership.
    They are no friend to animals or people. Not only should you not support them, you should oppose them whenever you see them getting involved in legislation or other activities. 99 times out of 100, they’re going to be up to no good.
    HSUS is no better, by the way–in fact, they share some of the same people, and they have the same long-term goal. They just have a name that makes people think they’re some kind of umbrella organization for shelters, and people haven’t quite caught on to their agenda yet, so they’re filthy rich.

    #490503

    Chrissy
    Member

    PETA is an ethical organisation for the pets and i certainly supports what they do and the campaigns they hold. They have alot of stories up on their wedsite and often spend some time reading about it. It is quite miserable for the animals =( . We ought to do a part if we can.

    #490504

    Brenda
    Member

    Some things that are printed about PETA are true and some are untrue. Peta faces overcrowding in their facilities when they take in too many animals that are neglected and abused. Other rescue facilities face the same problem. That is why I encourage all animal lovers to adopt. I cannot see paying a lot of money for a pure breed when there are so many animals out there that need forever loving homes. And,if you really want a pure breed, there are many adoption agencies that rescue pure breed dogs as well as pure breed mixes.

    #490505

    Donna
    Member

    The most important thing that people need to realize about PETA is that it LIES. It lies well, and often. It uses outdated footage from other parts of the world to illustrate alleged ongoing cruelty. It misrepresents and libels those it attacks. This has all been proven many times over. Not one thing PETA has portrayed has ever been completely accurate, and if you do not look deeper into it to find the truth, then you are, frankly, a fool. PETA takes advantage of fools and parts them from their hard-earned money. That money is used in illegal activities, libel campaigns, and to kill adoptable animals. PETA has been caught euthanizing adoptable animals before their truck even leaves the parking lot of where they were picked up. They’ve been caught dumping the carcasses in dumpsters.
    PETA and HSUS take anti-cruelty to the absolute darkest possible conclusion–there is no pain if you are dead. Make no mistake about it. The end of suffering is death, and that IS their goal. You’ve heard the phrase ‘better dead than bred’…how sick is that? If you had arthritis, would you rather die than continue to suffer? PETA wants to take away the option of survival for all animals. Any life that does not meet their idealistic standards is, in their eyes, not worth living at all.
    Is this REALLY what you believe? Look more closely at what you choose to support.

    #490506

    Brenda
    Member

    Who are you calling a fool? Peta exists because people have become intolerable towards animals. They might have started out as a caring organization, but greed got the better of them and when the profits started rolling in, those suits weren’t about to stop doing what was so profitable. If a lot of animals had to die as long as the cash was rolling in they looked the other way. I would like to see Peta shut down and so would a lot of other good folks. Until more regulations are passed and people take the time to really get involved and I mean involved, this Peta organization will go on and on.

    #490507

    Donna
    Member

    Um, I am calling people who do not look more deeply into things, and believe PETA’s propaganda without delving into the reality, fools.

    #490508

    Brenda
    Member

    Ok WingedWolf I agree with that. We animal lovers are horrified when we hear about carcasses being dumped in dumpsters and other atrocities that occur in our society daily. I have always adopted all of the animals I have ever shared my life with because that is the only decent thing to do and I get the sense that you have done the same.

    #490509

    Donna
    Member

    I have 0 against pure bred animals, and breeding animals. I don’t believe that preventing ethical breeders from operating would actually improve matters at all. Selective breeding is what enables us to have animals that are best adapted to be pets. Stop breeding selectively, and temperament, appearance, and health all become random. There are flaws in the way things have been done in the past, but since we understand them better, attempts are being made to correct them.
    I’ve never adopted an animal from a shelter. I got my first cat from someone giving away free kittens. The second was discovered, thin and covered with fleas and with a runny nose, cowering behind a dumpster, as a kitten. The third was given to me by someone who didn’t want him any longer. I also hand-reared two kittens that I found as newborns (behind a different dumpster). They were given to a pet store, which had them vaccinated and then sold them. (They sold quickly). I don’t currently own a cat, or a dog. My present home isn’t large enough for a dog. When I do get one, I have not yet decided where I’ll be getting it from, but it’s entirely possible I will get a pure bred dog from a good breeder.
    I’ve had hamsters, and birds, as a child–some were purchased from pet stores, and others from breeders.
    I breed pet snakes for a living. Ball pythons do occasionally wind up in shelters, but rarely stay there for long when they do. Small, harmless reptiles are quiet, easy to care for pets, and so remain in high demand.
    I believe that folks who really want to put animals into new homes need to stop devaluing them, and using language that tells the public that they are ‘unwanted’, ‘homeless’, ‘abandoned’, or ‘rescued’. No one wants an unwanted dog–if it’s unwanted, why would I want it? Now, if you want to sell a previously owned dog, that’s a different story altogether.
    The language of ‘adoption’ makes it sound as though a person is taking in a child, and doing a huge favor to society. It’s not a child, it’s a dog–sell it. Not just in the monetary sense, but in the advertising sense. People respond to the language you use. If you tell them that the animal is valuable, they’ll want it. If you tell them that they’re rescuing a poor, unwanted, abandoned animal, that’s only going to appeal to those who are self-sacrificing. It makes it sound as though the animal is going to be thankless work for them instead of an asset. It absolutely contributes to the problem. You know why pure bred dogs are so expensive? Because people want them, they value them. The animals are worth money, they’re special. Sell shelter animals the same way, and watch them disappear.
    Also, shelters need to stop being so insanely picky. I’m sure it’s frustrating when animals are returned by owners who can’t deal with them, but tightening up the restrictions to attempt to eliminate this entirely is dumb, and shuts out perfectly good pet owners from taking in pets from them. Just by way of example, I recently saw a person who wanted to foster pugs, and was turned down by two different pug rescues because they owned ball pythons. Never mind that a ball python is no threat to anything larger than a rat, or that they’re kept in a secure enclosure in a separate room…the ignorance of some rescue folks is astounding, and they turn down help and reject owners, and then complain that there are too many unwanted pets!
    I personally would be unlikely to adopt a pet from a shelter for this reason. I find it unreasonable that my owning a pet means someone can come into and inspect my home, and that they want to exercise control over that pet’s future. I am the one to decide whether my home is suitable. I’m a responsible pet owner, and also one who prefers their privacy. Purchasing a pet doesn’t mean I should give that up. THIS runs exactly contrary to the type of attitude that PETA fosters, so it probably sounds heretical to some, here.
    Finally, cats and dogs evolved to live with humans. Humans played an incidental role in domesticating them, initially. It was most likely not a deliberate process. These animals evolved to live within our society as scavengers, and when we don’t take them in and treat them as household members, they quite handily continue living the way they did for a thousand years before the concept of a household pet emerged. You aren’t going to eliminate homeless cats and dogs, because those animals will live and breed on their own just fine without our direct care, and they always have. So long as there are dumpsters to dig in, they’ll get by. The stories about the rough lives of street animals are designed to make people ignore the fact that wild animals have lives that are equally harsh, and if the dogs and cats weren’t doing well enough by nature’s standards, their populations wouldn’t be increasing through breeding–but they do. No matter how short and rough, if feral dogs and cats are increasing their numbers successfully through reproduction, that is what mother nature calls a ‘successful species’.
    The real reason we don’t want them doing that is that it is dangerous, damaging, and above all, horribly inconvenient for us humans when they do it. It’s nothing to do with the quality of THEIR lives, which are just as hail and hearty as that of any raccoon or opossum, provided they were raised in those conditions. (Yes, they face disease, starvation, fights, and accidents–just like any wild animal does).
    I’m not a fan of hypocrisy, and PETA is the absolute king of it. If animals are supposed to be allowed to live their lives freely, then capturing feral cats and dogs should be anathema to them. So, obviously it’s not about what the cats and dogs want, now, is it?
    You can’t eliminate homeless pets, because even if you stopped all deliberate breeding, these species would continue to breed just fine on their own, without a care toward the fact that they are ‘homeless’. The solution lies in a different direction.

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