PUPPY PADS NOT WORKING!!!!!!!

Topic Stats: 1385 views, 4 replies and 1 subscribers.

Jan 25th, 2005 00:00
California
Symba
Message Me!
Add to Friends
Junior Member
hi there i have a 16 week old chihuiah named Symba, i have hade him for almost 3 weeks now and he has no ida what to do when i put him on the paper ???? when i see him starting to go i pick him up and run him to the pads by the back door. but when i get there he just looks at me, i have hade him there for 15 min once and nothing!!! and when i go back to where he was befor i picked him up there is a little spot!!!!!!!! we are thinking about crate traning him but how??? what is the RIGHT way??? im so sceard he will never get is what should i do????????????? ???
Post Reply
Jan 25th, 2005 00:00
California
CA-Wayne
Message Me!
Add to Friends
Junior Member
Absolutely, positively CRATE TRAIN. I thought this was a cruel method of house training, but my Boston Terrier actually now thinks of her crate as a ?safe haven,? heading into it to chew on a Nylabone while we eat dinner, or just to chill every now and then. Your pup is still young enough that crate training should be easy. He may yelp or whine the first couple of nights, but don?t give in. This is how we did it with our Boston Pup, Chloe: We bought a crate that was big enough for her to stand up in and turn around in, but without giving her a huge amount of room. Find a dog bed that fits inside. The crate sat on the floor in the bedroom, next to our bed. Before bed time, we would take Chloe for one last walk. At bed time, she was placed in the crate and the door was shut. If she whined or yelped, we gently tapped on the top of the crate, said ?sleep Chloe? and that usually did the trick ? even if we had to do it 2 or 3 times. (We did some good play time right before bed to make sure she was tired.) For the first few months she would wake up a time or two and we always had puppy pads in the master bath for her to use. Eventually though, we slowly weaned her off getting up in the middle of the night and now, at 11 months, she sleeps through the night. See, pups don?t want to soil their ?home? (thus the reason for not getting an oversized crate), so crate training teaches them bladder control. We plan to start leaving her crate door open when she turns 1 next month and see how she does. (But she does like her crate and it will always remain there for her.) NOW?about getting your pup to go on puppy pads during awake hours. Chloe learned this almost immediately so I highly suggest this. Following feeding times, we immediately put her on a leash, walked her to her puppy pads and said, ?Go, Big Girl.? Puppies generally go right after eating (and after a long round of play). We?d hold her there until she went. Patience is key, because this may take some time. But once they?ve done it a few times, it?ll start to become easier; they?ll start to understand what they need to do. (Also - for the first few months, your pups meals should take place in the crate. Place the bowl inside and shut the door. Open it when they're done and take them immediately to their designated "go" spot.) If you are taking the pup outside to go, then designate a specific spot and do the same thing there, holding him there, encouraging him to go with a specific saying of your choosing (similar to our ?Go Big Girl.?) After a few days of that sort of training when Chloe was 9 weeks old, she started running to her pee pads whenever she had to go. There was the occasional accident but they were few and far between. Eventually she got to the point she is now, where she will hold it until her designated walk times. At 11 months we walk her when we get up, again at a lunch break (either 11a or noon depending on who comes home), after work at 5p, then one last walk before bed. Well, I hope this helps. I definitely think the main key is crate training. (If you buy a crate that takes into consideration your dogs future growth, then make sure you block off a portion of it to conform to his current size. Otherwise he may go in a far back corner, then curl up to sleep in the front area. (We went the expensive route and just upsized 3 times before finally getting her current crate. We donated the smaller ones to a pet shelter in town.) One last thing: Don?t get discouraged. Understand that this process will take time and you need to stick with it. Your efforts will pay off a few months down the line. GOOD LUCK! :)
Post Reply
Jan 27th, 2005 00:00
Virginia
Karen_Peak
Message Me!
Add to Friends
Gold Member
Puppy pads failformany reasons - 1) Teaches it is OK to potty inside the house. Some pups decide to go wherever they want in the house. 2) Puppies develop a surface preference and many may not want to go on other surfaces. I do not recommend teaching a pup it is OK to potty inside and then try to housetrain later - too confusing. Best to teach the right way from day one... Unless of course you are willing to deal wit ha dog who for the next 10 - 15 years or more thinks it is OK to go in the house. The following is what I teach in classes and if done consistently by the owner is very effective to housetrain any age dog: General Tips: Use the crate less and leashes and baby gates more during the day to keep pup or adult dog with you. Crates are for when you are not awake or home to monitor pup and keep him safe. If he is right with you, you can stop the undesired behavior as it starts. He also gets a chance to learn to signal you and you get to learn how to read his signals. Signals will vary dog to dog and may range from a simple glance towards a door to circling, sniffing, etc. When a dog starts to act anxious or give what I feel may be a signal, I ask if the dog/pup needs to go out. NOTE: If you work during the day and a young pup is going to be home alone for more than four hours, you need to either adapt your schedule so you can give the pup a midday potty break and walk or hire a dog walker to do this. Long periods without being able to get out and potty will force the pup to either potty in the crate or in the house if he is left confined to a room. The pup learns out of necessity to potty inside and may stop signaling to you when you are out of site when he has to go. Adolescent dogs should be able to hold for up to six hours. An older adolescent or adult dog may be able to hold up to eight hours. And at night, young pups may only be able t hold for three or four hours, adult dogs should be able to hold all night. But ignoring possible signals for having to potty may result in the critter having to potty inside out of necessity. The dog or pup gets taken out ON LEAD and is given five minutes to potty. Give the dog a cue phrase like ?Go Potty,? ?Get Busy,? ?Kennel Up,? that the dog will be taught to associate with the desired behavior ? BE CONSISTENT with the cue used. If potty does not happen, you both go back in, lead stays ON and things are boring. If I see potential signaling again, I repeat. Do this until successful potty outside. Once potty outside has happened - LEASH OFF AND PLAY and you may begin your walk! Many dogs will walk and walk until they are ready to potty because we teach them that we will stay out as long as it takes for them to go. So if we set limits, we are back in control and the dog learns that play or walking comes AFTER he does his business. Now the pup starts to learn a sequence: this action inside when I feel like this (remember to watch for body language indicating the pup or dog may have to go) gets this response, I do this, and I get fun. When I do not do this, we go back inside, I get boring. Dogs do not think like we do and they need to learn each section of the sequence of events leading up to pottying outside and that eventual reward they want. We cannot verbally explain it to them; they have to learn by experience as so we when it comes to reading their body language. I never let dogs or pups learning housetraining manners out of my site. They have to learn how to signal me. When they are reliably signaling me and approaching me in that room to let me know they have to potty, and then I will give GRADUAL freedoms and add a second room. I progress gradually as each new level of challenge is mastered. If there is a regression, I regress back to a safer point and restrict house freedom to whatever room or two I am in and then start again. When the dog is good during the day, I will start adding gradual freedoms at night. If the dog is reliably housetrained at night and also not destructive, I start adding gradual house freedoms during the day when I am not home. This will start with one room and for short periods and gradually progress with time and expansion into more of the house as the dog learns. Sample Puppy/New Dog Schedule: Depending on the age of your puppy will depend on how many meals he eats a day. Puppies up to about six months should be getting three meals: breakfast, lunch, dinner. At 5 ? 6 months, start to wean him to breakfast and dinner. Feed Puppy at the same time each meal and use a potty schedule that corresponds to eating. Here is an example: 6:30 a.m. - wake up and take Puppy to go potty. 6:45 a.m. - feed Puppy in crate and give him water. 7:15 a.m. - take Puppy to go potty. Young puppies have small bladders and less capacity. They may need to go out every couple of hours during the day. 11:30 a.m. - take Puppy potty 11:45 a.m. - feed Puppy in crate 12:30 p.m. - take Puppy potty Puppies, like children, benefit from naps after play. Put Puppy in his crate with a drink and a few safe toys and let him ?go sleepies? for an hour or so. 4:30 p.m. - take Puppy potty 5:00 p.m. - feed Puppy supper in crate 5:30 p.m. - take Puppy potty Evenings, especially in the summer when it is cooler, are a great time to take Puppy for walks and socialize him. Plus, this will help tire him out for the evening. 8:00 p.m. - pick up water for evening 9:00 p.m. - take Puppy potty 9:30 p.m. - put Puppy in crate for bed Note: young puppies cannot be expected to hold all night. It can be months until they have enough bladder control so be patient. If puppy has not pottied and has been asleep for a few hours, he may have to go again. Ignoring whines in a pup or adult dog that needs to go out can result in him learning to tolerate messing in the crate. Once this habit develops, it can be tough to work out. So, do not let it happen in the first place. When the puppy is not in the crate for eating and sleeping, he should be with you and under close supervision. Overuse of the crate can actually delay housetraining or the pup learns only not to potty in the crate and how to signal you from the crate that he has to go out. He does not learn that potty rules apply to very room in the house. If you work all day and pup will be crated for more than 4 hours for a younger pup or six hours for an adolescent, you should either make the time to get home for lunch and exercise the pup or hire a midday dog walker. Should Puppy have an accident in the house, you must catch him in the act for discipline to be effective. Puppies and dogs forget faster and will interpret the discipline not being done because he pottied in the house but for something different. Clean up the spot well and with something that will neutralize the odor. Use one of the commercially made products or white vinegar and water. I am against paper training or using those special pads that ?encourage? Puppy to go potty on them (unless there is a physical reason why you cannot get out ? like a disability). Paper training teaches Puppy it is fine to potty in the house. Now you want to teach him he cannot do something once OK. It is confusing. The puppy or adult dog may never reliably housetrain or may experience delays in housetraining due to confusion. Refreshing Housetraining in Older Pups and Adult Dogs: It takes time and effort to housetrain a dog reliably. Some will housetrain very fast while others may take months or more. Often, housetraining issues are a direct result of the human. The owner must have reasonable expectations based on age and ability. Younger pups will not and senior dogs may not be able to hold as long as a healthy, adult dog. If you notice accidents starting up in a reliably housetrained dog (one that had gone months or longer and is reliably signaling and holding when in the house), first rule out medical. Bladder infections, urine crystals or bladder stones, being on certain medications, certain diseased that cause an increase in thirst and etc., can all cause accidents to occur in a reliably housetrained dog. Even reliably housetrained dogs may occasionally ?slip up? for one reason or another. If there is no medical reason (and you have ruled it out), then you need to get back to basics with housetraining. Regressions often will not go away on their own nor should they be ignored. If you see a non-medical regression starting, address it immediately by treating the dog as if it is not housetrained.
Post Reply
Replies are ordered oldest to newest. Order may vary due to time differences. You need to be Registered and Signed In to post a reply to this topic.