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14 thoughts on “Manx

  • Jan 1, 2008 at 12:00
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    I am from Indiana and my sister and I both have a Manx they were from one of her cat’s litter the only two out of four that are left. I have a female and she has a male. You can tell they are litter mates due to the markings they look like, twins, but have a different character to them. They both are VERY loving and both are very fast and can jump a VERY long distance. The male has no tail at all, the female has a little nub of a tail. If you have any info that you would like to share please do: tenish_bara@msn.com

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  • Jan 1, 2008 at 12:00
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    I think that most Manx now a day have long tails. I don’t appreciate my cat being known as a short tailed rump

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  • Jan 1, 2008 at 12:00
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    I just adopted a Manx cat from the pet center in Manassas Va. I had no clue on what kind of cat she was until the SPCA told me. I paid $70 to adopt her. I am fascinated by this cat. She is so intelligent and very affectionate. I have never had an animal so loving. I have 2 children ages 4 and 5 and that cat is gentle and loving to them. Indefinitely would consider buying another one. dacotab@hotmail.com

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  • Jan 1, 2008 at 12:00
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    Hello to all that are interested in this same breed. I have posted about the Manxes my sister and I had. Yes that is right "had" was said. Unfortunately not long after I commented on this page my Manx was hit on the road. She was not supposed to have been out of the house but somehow she got lose. My sister’s was found in the yard in August killed from what we don’t know. They really are missed and were the best cats we have ever had. If you know of anyone that is wanting to get rid of or have a Manx feel free to let me know. Thank You: tenish_bara@msn.com

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  • Jan 1, 2008 at 12:00
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    Manx cats are best "known" for their tailessness, however there is more to know about this breed. Registered, purebred, Manx cats can and are born with a full length tails. Sadly, tailed Manx kittens are usually docked due to the breed recognition and consumer demand of being a tailless cat. America is the only country today to practice tail docking. Thankfully, tail docking is on the decline as reputable breeders take responsibility to teach the public it’s not necessary. A tailed Manx cat is still 100% Manx if born from purebred parents, even with a full tail. The tailessness is only one characteristic of this breed, it has many other traits that make it a Manx breed cat. A good comparison might be to the purebred Scottish Fold or Sphynx breeds. Scottish Folds can be born with their ears unfolded however, they are still Scottish Folds. The Sphynx can be born with fur, it too is still 100% Sphynx. Having purebred parents is an important requirement in the Manx breed. If the parents are not purebred or registered all you really have is a "Domestic Tailless" cat. The genetic mutation which causes the Manx cat to be born tailless can happen in any breed of cat, this does NOT make it a Manx breed cat! There are other cat breeds with varying tail lengths and appearances, for instance the Japanese Bobtail and the American Bobtail. Most publicized health problems associated with the Manx breed occur in "Domestic Tailless" cats than with registered Manx cats.

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  • Jan 1, 2008 at 12:00
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    The Manx is a fascinating breed of cat unlike any other. Highly intelligent and very protective of it’s human companion and house. A very powerful cat yet it is the most friendly cat I’ve ever met. They love their humans friends just as dogs do. They follow you around and observe everything you do. The Manx is the perfect cat. They are always happy and never seem to get into those "cat moods". An old saying is: "When mother nature saw fit to remove the tail of the Manx, she left in place of the tail, more cat" and "Once you get to know a Manx, you will never look at a "cat" the same way again"

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  • Jan 1, 2008 at 12:00
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    There are no associated disorders or diseases associated with the Manx gene for taillessness.

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  • Jan 1, 2008 at 12:00
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    I love my manx, Waldo, with all my heart. He is such an adorable, loveable cat. He indeed does follow me everywhere I go and is sweet as can be. He is what they call a "stubbie" I guess, which makes him so unique. I love that about the Manx breed. his fur is so soft and supple and he is so well-mannered. I have never had such a wonderful, well-behaved & affectionate cat ever. I’m adopting another one tomorrow, I think they are that great!

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  • Jan 1, 2008 at 12:00
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    it is unfortunate but the "Manx Syndrome" is in fact a reality though should not be references as an issue do to being a Manx. All tailless cats if true to the rumpy can inherit nerve shortage in the spine that can create uncontrolled bowl and urinary tract issues. I am a former breeder of Manx cats, not the domestic American variety which are prone to short stubby round appearance but the true Manx variety which was a longer and slightly taller athletic cat. Mine range from Rumpy to Rumpy Riser to Bobs. I have one tailed and the primary reason for docking tailed Manx in the past was due to tail issues such as arthritis or deformities that would happen later in life. To amputate a tail of an adult can can be life threatening. Manx cats were prone to tail disorders. Many breeders these days no longer tail dock and it is good for breeding to use tailed variety. These "Dog" cats are exceptional hunters but at the same time can be leashed trained, will play fetch and in my case as the rule is when looking for a Manx, do so at eye level. It is truly not at their eye level but at yours. Mine prefer to be on bookshelves, kitchen cabinets etc.

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  • Jan 1, 2008 at 12:00
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    My daughter rescued two black Manx cats they are brothers and have been neutered, I have kept cats all my life but never had a Manx before, they are the most playful "helpful" cats I have ever owned. I love this breed of cat and would recommend them to anyone who want a lovable friendly "helpful" pet that will keep them amused (and sometimes exasperated) always.

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  • Jan 1, 2008 at 12:00
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    I love my manx, he is so awesome to have I want to get another one. He is so good and the neighbors just love him to pieces because he follows me across the street, and usually waits for me. They are like a dog.

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  • Oct 2, 2008 at 12:00
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    I purchased my Manx from a breeder in the spring of 1992, and he was the best pet anyone could ask for. He was the most loving and intelligent cat I’ve ever seen. Sadly, he passed away this last September at the ripe old age of 17. He lived a long, happy and love filled life. I would recommend the Manx breed to anyone considering getting a cat. I am sure to have another in the future once my broken heart mends of course. 🙁
       
    R.I.P. Titter

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  • Feb 22, 2009 at 12:00
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    I had rescued a brother and sister Manx at a year old and thought I would have no problem fostering them out. My neighbor had had a Manx (which was a very sweet cat), so I thought fostering would not be an issue. My only stipulations where that they would not be separated, they would remain inside cats and if any problems they would revert back to me.
       
    The prior owners decided after a year they would keep them as outside cats ~ most unexceptiable to me. Espiecially since I was the one to return my neighbors cat to them after being killed crossing a busy road.
       
    The night I received them ~ it was all over. I had one on either side of me and they both started licking my face; but already having 2 cats ~ an additional 2 were not in my plan.
       
    The female (Ali) is a cream, greyish tan tiger with subtal tiger stripes, blue eyes, short stub tail and the additional 6th toe.
       
    Her brother (Tiger, formally Gator) on the other hand is a dark tiger longer tail and no 6th toe. They are insepartable. They sleep together tangled and entwined. However; after the first attempt to foster out, I was informed the male had a peeing problem. Two weeks later they were returned and several months of a peeing problem, my Vet had determined that a high testerone level along with "other actions", there was a physical condition causing the issue whci turned out to be a encrypted testicle ~ which the original Vet wae willing to redo.
       
    I was more than happy to take them back no matter what.
       
    Tiger still has "behavioral" peeing issues (now on anti-anxiety meds, which help…)
       
    I would highly recommend this breed. So sweet, loving, active and vocal, very vocal at times ~ they are adorable and I’m thankful for the way it all worked out.

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  • Aug 8, 2010 at 12:00
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    I have 2 Manx brother’s and the one is VERY vocal. He gets, what we call, the "crazies" LOL He tears thru the house, at times, chattering away. Very comical. Our other Manx plays fetch. They are more like a dog in a cat suit.

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